Archive for the ‘Vertical Farming’ Category

Excuse me, there’s a microsievert in my soup.

Heading back to Tokyo on the bus today, I’m most disturbed by the news that there is radiation in the water. No kidding.

Sure, the levels aren’t enough to kill a fly in a year, but the fact is significant because just yesterday there was no radiation in the water – at least none that I know of.

And that’s how we’re going with everything these days. From water to air to earth we’re incrementally poisoning ourselves, and everything else, with pollution of some kind. Not a day seems to go by where yet another toxin or “dangerous levels of fill-in-the-blank are detected” in someone’s critical resource. The planet is finite and the headlines are gorging on lakes and peninsulas.

As biological entities, our most important requirement is food. Without it, we simply can’t continue our lives in a normal way.

One of the things that differentiates us from 3rd world countries is our bountiful selection of fruits, vegetables, grains, meats and all the other foods we take for granted. If that disappears, I’m sure we will quickly notice the difference.

This may not be an imminent crisis, but with the world’s population forecast to grow to 9 billion by 2050 it’s certainly looming large on our collective horizon. We can’t continue to destroy our land and water with pollutants, many of which are symptoms of rampant factory farming and industrial agriculture. As things stand now, we are in big trouble.

With that in mind, how many creative solutions to our food dilemma do you see being embraced by our leaders? Most, if not all of the people with real political power appear to be doing little more than shifting around the small print in the status quo laws that were becoming obsolete in 1995. The people with the “other kind” of power appear to be bank-rolling and lobbying that apathy and the active destruction of even those paltry laws. Their preference is for processed and packaged foods, all of which require factories, more energy, more chemicals, more transportation, and all the other markers of corporate residence.

Yet there is an entire culture of people in each of our countries crying out for real changes to be made that can help their communities to become sustainable and healthy – places you want to live and work in because they’re fresh and innovative and actually doing something that makes our world work better.

So I want to talk about a real solution. Some people have called it a pipe-dream, and it’s realistic to say that it’s technically difficult and will be challenging, but we’ve managed to harness the atom at 442 reactors worldwide to power the lives of countless people. I think we’re up to it.

Vertical farming was recently introduced by Columbia University Professor Dr. Dickson Despommier. He proposes building high-tech urban 50-story buildings, for example, intelligently designed to take advantage of solar and wind power options, loaded with hydroponic, aeroponic, and aquaponic apparatus to take back control of our food systems.

His vision for these buildings includes water recovery and local waste-water treatment, power generation from biological waste, and integration into local community needs. There are many other advantages to the vertical farm that he mentions in his book, but my eyes are starting to cross looking at my iPhone and my stubby fingers have had enough. One important part of the concept: quite a few good-paying jobs.

Despommier estimates that a 50-story building occupying 1 city block could feed 50,000 people, and a quick calculation shows that if we were to build them, 442 vertical farms could feed 22,100,000 people.
How many vertical farms could you build for the cost of one nuclear reactor?

Currently, huge swaths of our countries that used to be invaluable peak-ecosystem hardwood forest are now being plowed, over-fertilized and factory farmed year after year. The toll on soil and water systems is debilitating, and getting worse.

So what are we going to do? Continue to grow the same old way, eating our way through hectares like Doritos at a fraternity party? Or are we going to, as Despommier suggests in his subtitle, grow up?

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